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Rebel Insights

How We Created a New Social Platform for Food

One of the pillars of RebelMouse is our lightning-fast site launches. We love the fact that we can create a successful media property in little to no time at all. But there's more to RebelMouse than a quick launch turnaround. We can also create + customize pretty much anything you want — and we did just that with My Recipe Magic.

Our team created an entirely new web community on My Recipe Magic that is dynamic and social. It's kind of like Pinterest, but for food only. Your one-stop shop for all things yummy. It's a place to find, share, and create new recipes, and it's pretty addictive.

Here's how My Recipe Magic is standing out from their competition:

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Case Studies

How One Country Turned a Fan Following into a Monetization Powerhouse

Country isn't a zip code. Country is a state of mind. That's the core strategy behind One Country — a new media company dedicated to celebrating country music culture through not just music, but fashion, food, and lifestyle.

One Country was originally on WordPress before switching to RebelMouse. But after enjoying publishing on the RebelMouse platform for several years, their ownership changed and One Country's future became uncertain. Everyone — including RebelMouse founder Paul Berry, who served on One Country's advisory board at the time — knew One Country was a powerful asset with the potential to turn a loyal following into real revenue.

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Case Studies

Azula Sees 398% Facebook Growth in Switch to RebelMouse

At the end of August 2017, Azula switched to RebelMouse, leaving WordPress in their rear-view mirror. Since then, traffic to their site from Facebook has risen 398%.

Wait, what? How can that be? Aren't publishers supposed to be seeing decreases in traffic from the big blue social media machine? Well, in short, a lot of them are. But it's not because Facebook decided to hurt them or tweak publishers into giving them more money. It's because publishers haven't been able to adapt to platform changes fast enough to avoid the natural traffic penalty of falling behind the times.

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