Subscribe to Our Newsletter

x

What's Next After Facebook

It's always hard to imagine what is next until suddenly it's dramatically obvious.

It is now completely clear. The first phase of the internet confused freedom of speech with code of conduct. Platforms built through the hard work of good people are being used to spread hate across the world at rates we have never seen before. The largest platforms in the world are now completely toxic. And in our decades of enduring this, the toxicity has become normalized. What women endure online — as an important example — is worth sobbing over (and I honestly hope you do).


Trump is the first Facebook president. He put all of his (and Russia's) campaign money into social. Not only was it immoral for Facebook to take the money of a bully to make their quarter, but they continue to operate a broken paradigm. Trump should have been banned at least five years ago for his abusive bullying online. Now he threatens a nuclear holocaust on Twitter, and Jack Dorsey stays silent.

This is because the platforms of today were built from the ground up on the model of free speech. Which is fine. Those platforms can exist for you to say whatever you want for good or ill. It's not like we can have an enforceable code of conduct for the entirety of the open web. But we can have a code of conduct for the social platforms we choose to use. And the right one will emerge to be a safe place where there is no room for bullies.

Twitter and Facebook have their codes of conduct already in place and have every single reason to ban Donald Trump from using the platforms they worked so very hard to create. After all, the only thing at stake is the tens of millions of lives that will be lost when he uses our nuclear force on an impoverished country, or the fact that he tortures the weak in our very own country — one many generations worked so very hard to build.

I believe culture is malleable. It is ideas that change culture. We have a responsibility to work on spreading the ideas that matter, and to spread them on platforms that value their code of conduct as much as we value our Constitution.

RebelMouse CEO + Founder Paul Berry vocalizes what we were all thinking in May 2017.

The Washington Post releases details on the story four months later.

You're almost there! Fill out the form below and a Rebel will contact you within one business day.

x

Meet RebelMouse

Build on a better platform that supports far-reaching content distribution, impactful conversion, and unparalleled loyalty.

The world's largest companies trust us to power their global, multiplatform content experience. As a platform, we're now one of the largest in the world, reaching 50+ million people every month. As a creative agency, we build mass pop culture hits that grow organically to become household names — Axios and The Dodo, for example.

We work strategically with United Airlines and many other brands to establish the new media roadmap for their future and implement it. RebelMouse was founded by the CTO who built The Huffington Post. The founding vision and mission is still the same today: to be the right new media platform for both media companies and brands. It's working exceedingly well, and we're delivering some staggering results for our clients.

Read our latest deck here!

Keep reading... Show less

Easily Snap RebelMouse Into Slack

RebelMouse offers a Slack integration that allows you to sync your editorial process with Slack's notifications. We can set up three events that trigger notifications:

  • Changed stages in the editorial process
  • Edited a post
  • Published a post
Keep reading... Show less

A Seamless Transition: Introducing RebelMouse to New Team Members

Behind every site powered by RebelMouse, there's a team of dedicated content creators, storytellers, developers, and leaders who are working to make sure their site is growing and flourishing. Sometimes, these teams fluctuate as new members join and others leave.

Keep reading... Show less

How to Use Variables to Set Colors Across Your Site

Why This Is Important

You can easily set colors for every element of your site on RebelMouse, including the color of your text, links, and headlines. Usually there's a set of 2–3 colors used across a site. But instead of hardcoding the color on every element, you can use variables to make it so that if a color needs to change, you can update it in one place instead of everywhere — making future maintenance easy.

Keep reading... Show less

Learn More About RebelMouse’s High-Performing Infrastructure

To ensure every site powered by RebelMouse is high performing, secure, and optimized for user experience, we only use the best and most reliable methods to host our infrastructure. Here's a detailed look at some of the services and security measures we use every day to secure maximum stability and security for each of our sites.

Keep reading... Show less

You're almost there! Fill out the form below and a Rebel will contact you within one business day.

x

Stepped Entry Editor: Guide Your Users Through Content Creation

Small, dedicated teams can create quality content that helps your site grow traffic organically. RebelMouse's platform enables multiple communities with granular permissions and simplified contribution tools to create a collaborative workflow built for creators.

Keep reading... Show less

How to Fix: Invalid Twitter Card

Sometimes when you share a RebelMouse article to Twitter, it will render the tweet without a Card:

Keep reading... Show less

When to Use the Post Content Element’s Lead Media Properties

RebelMouse's Layout & Design tool makes designing your site easy and intuitive. But there are certain design factors you need to take into account when building out your site.

When creating a post page (i.e., the landing page for any article that a user is directed or navigates to), styling it is slightly different from other pages because it requires you to use the Lead Media property of a Post Content element. Within the context of our Layout & Design tool, "Lead Media" is defined as the main post tied to a post page's URL, which includes all of its images, media, and text.

By contrast, the Posts element displays all other articles (or posts) that aren't the main post you land on. These are the subsequent posts on a page that appear afterward as you scroll — such as in an infinite scroll setup, for example.

Keep reading... Show less
Subscribe to Our Newsletter