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deckerlibrary: deckerlibrary: Happy birthday to one of our...
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deckerlibrary:

deckerlibrary:

Happy birthday to one of our favorite artists (and style icons), Yayoi Kusama! The prolific artist turns 87 today! 

Yayoi Kusama: I Love Me (52199 DVD).

Yayoi Kusama: I want to Live Forever (N7359 .K87 A4 2009A Quarto).

Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, 1958-1968 (N7359 .K87 A4 1998 Quarto).

Yayoi Kusama: Mirrored Years (N7359 .K87 A4 2009 Stacks).

We can’t wait to see the Kusama exhibition, Infinity Mirrors at the Hirshhorn!

mypubliclands: Let’s celebrate #WorldFrogDay! The beginning of...
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A frog at Wood River Wetlands in Oregon. Photo by Greg Shine, BLM

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A wood house toad in Utah. Photo by BLM Utah

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A frog at Tablerock Wilderness in Oregon. Photo by Corbin Murphy, BLM

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A frog at Rock Creek Recreation in Oregon. Photo by BLM Oregon/Washington

mypubliclands:

Let’s celebrate #WorldFrogDay!

The beginning of Spring is the perfect opportunity to learn a little more about some of the creatures who welcome the warmer weather – frogs, and March 21 also happens to be World Frog Day!

Quite a few species of frogs and toads call BLM-managed public lands home. The BLM manages the nation’s most ecologically diverse aquatic habitats, ranging from isolated desert springs to Alaska’s North Slope tributaries. The habitats total 132,000 miles of fish-bearing streams and rivers, 3 million acres of lakes and reservoirs, 150,000 miles of riparian areas, and 13 million acres of wetlands. Aquatic resources on BLM-managed public lands support the nation’s aquatic biodiversity, support public recreation, and help sustain Native American cultural heritages.

To learn more about the BLM’s fisheries and aquatics program, click here.

ilovecephalopods: I went to the Denver museum of nature and...
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Mockup of what life looked like some billions of years ago.

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Different fossils from different ancient cepholapods!

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It's so freakin hilarious to see a model of an 'ancient nautilus' in the dinosaur room cause they still look the same!

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beeeaaauuuttiful cluster of ammonite fossils!

ilovecephalopods:

I went to the Denver museum of nature and science on thursday to see an exhibit on Vikings, and while I was there I looked at an exhibit about earth from the very beginning, to the beginnings of life, to dinosaurs, to where we are now!

and of course there were lots of cephalopods and of course i had to take pictures!

americasgreatoutdoors: Happy National Puppy Day! Did you know...
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americasgreatoutdoors:

Happy National Puppy Day! Did you know that dogs aren’t the only animals with pups? Other species, like the fox, have young that are also called pups. In the spring, a mother fox gives birth to a litter of 2-12 pups (also called kits). When the pups are about seven months old, they’re ready to strike out on their own. By winter the pup will find a mate and will stay with that mate for the rest of their life. Check out more photos of different pup species: https://on.doi.gov/puppies

Photo of a red fox at Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey by Ashleigh Scully via U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

paintingyear1lsad: Optical trickery plays a part in Tauba...
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paintingyear1lsad:

Optical trickery plays a part in Tauba Auerbach’s “Fold” paintings, which occupy what she calls “a liminal state between two or three dimensions.” So what if the artist is a vintage clotheshorse? She’s a reader of science and art magazines, and her latest fascination is for hyperbolic surfaces and fractal patterns.

Women’s Work":http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/t-magazine/28talk-women.html

–_T Magazine/The New York Times_ (February 2010)

George Michael was 23 when he sat for this interview, which has...
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George Michael was 23 when he sat for this interview, which has never been broadcast before.

He had just embarked on his solo career after leaving Wham!. During the conversation, George Michael talks about his sexuality and shedding his pop-ballad persona ala Careless Whisper. He reflects on the power of his fame, as he recalls the historical trip Wham! took to play in communist-China in 1985.

NEW from @blankonblank!

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thegetty: These ultra-detailed engravings come from an...
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thegetty:

These ultra-detailed engravings come from an 18th-century book depicting treasures from a German “cabinet of curiosities,” a collection of wonders that was the precursor to the modern museum.

The book, “Microscopic amusements for the mind as well as the eyes” (“Amusements microscopiques tant pour l'esprit, que pour les yeux”), also includes mechanical diagrams and microscopic close-ups of natural wonders, including insects, dust, scales, feathers, and blood.

Pictured here—Plate 47: Tulip. Plate 43: Cross-section of a fir tree branch. Plate 26: Moths and caterpillars. Plate 33: Hairball (boule de poil). Plate 11: Diagram of a new model of microscope.

See all three digitized volumes and more delightful plates: Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3, on the Internet Archive.

sciencenewsforstudents: Frogs’ have a remarkable power to...
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sciencenewsforstudents:

Frogs’ have a remarkable power to tongue-grab prey as big as mice or as oddly shaped as tarantulas. How do they do this? The ability stems from a combo of peculiar saliva and a super-squishy tongue, new data show.

The first detailed analysis of the stickiness of frog saliva finds that the fluid can shift rather abruptly from gooey to runny, notes Alexis Noel. She is a mechanical engineer at Georgia Tech in Atlanta. Those quick changes come in handy during the various phases of a single tongue strike. And it all works because the tongue itself is so soft.

Internet videos of frogs feasting sparked Noel’s curiosity about their ability “to eat furry things, hairy things, slimy things,” she says. And, she adds, they do so with speed and power. A frog tongue strikes five times more quickly than a human can blink.

But a frog’s tongue is so soft that none of the standard tools on Noel’s campus could measure it without special modifications. The engineer eventually figured out that this tissue is as soft as a brain. And both the brain and tongue are softer than a marshmallow.

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frontlinepbs: When journalist Ramita Navai was on a reporting...
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frontlinepbs:

When journalist Ramita Navai was on a reporting trip inside Iraq last year, she heard a number that struck her: 643.

That’s how many men and boys have gone missing from Saqlawiyah, an Iraqi town 45 miles from Baghdad, locals there told Navai as she filmed Iraq Uncovered, a new FRONTLINE documentary premiering Tues., March 21.

The alleged kidnappers? They’re not ISIS members. Rather, locals told Navai, they’re the militia group that drove ISIS from the town.

“They said they would give them back soon, and now it’s been four months,” one woman who fled Saqlawiyah tells Navai about her missing male relatives in this excerpt from Iraq Uncovered. “I just want them to tell me if they’re dead or alive.”

“I have 11 people missing from Saqlawiyah — my sons, brothers, husband, brother-in-law and uncle,” another woman says, crying.

In Iraq Uncovered, Navai makes a dangerous and revealing journey inside areas of the war-torn country where few journalists have gone — investigating allegations of abuse of Sunni Muslim civilians by powerful Shia militias in areas like Saqlawiyah where ISIS has been pushed out.

Follow the story in “Iraq Uncovered,” airing 3/21 at 10/9c on @pbstv & online.

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